Tag Archives: advertising

TV Commercial: Japanese Advertising Secrets

An interesting and unusual TV commercial for sushi from Japan.

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Movado: An Ad Worthy of an Art Museum

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There’s a class of ads for luxury brands found in upscale magazines like Vogue and Vanity Fair that utilize images and little, if any, copy. The advertisers take it for granted that the reader is familiar with the brands, therefore no explanation is necessary.

Movado is one of the brands that advertise this way. According to Wikipedia:

The company is known for its iconic Museum Watch which is defined by a single gold dot symbolizing the sun at high noon, the hands suggesting the movement of the earth. The original Museum Watch was the first wrist watch to be displayed at the Museum of Modern Art and was designed by the American designer Nathan George Horwitt in 1947. Edward Steichen, the rewnowned photographer and director of the photography department at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, proclaimed Horwitt’s design “the only truly original and beautiful one for such an object”.

True to the artistic origins of the timepiece, the ad agency has crafted an image worthy of being framed and hung on the wall. We like it.

By Marc Librescu

Just For Fun: Le Trefle

Yeah, we’re back. Stranger things have happened.

Hellmann’s Real Mayonnaise: Be Careful What You Ask Readers

Hellmann's Mayonnaise

In this ad for their Real Mayonnaise, Hellmann’s (there is no Hellmann’s anymore, it’s actually a company called Unilever) asks the question:

If we knew more about our food, would we eat better?”

Any reasonable person would answer “of course!” And Hellmann’s, um, Unilever, wants to you answer that way, too. End of story. Turn the page.

If you bother to stop and read the copy (which is difficult due to the placement of white type over a yellow background) you find this:

At Hellmann’s, we make our mayonnaise with real, simple ingredients like good eggs, delicious vinegar and oils rich in omega 3. So it’s definitely a step in the right direction. Lean about he Real Food Project at hellmanns.com.

When they say they use good eggs, it’s not clear whether they’re referring to the quality of the eggs or whether they’re stating that eggs are good for you. Either way, I’ll let this slide.

Strangely, they claim to use delicious vinegar. If I asked you to write a list of 10 adjectives to describe vinegar, would delicious make it onto the list? How about a list of 1,000 adjectives? Who considers vinegar to be delicious? It’s acetic acid.

Imagine saying to your kid, “Here, Bobby, I poured you a nice cup of delicious vinegar. Drink it up!”

If you made your kids drink vinegar, social services would come to your house to take them away. The conversation would go something like this:

Social Services: We have a report that you made your son, Bobby, drink a glass of vinegar.
You: Yes, I did.
Social Services: Can you tell me why you did that?
You: Because vinegar is delicious!

The next thing you know, they’d hand you some paperwork with a hearing date and then escort little Bobby out the door where they would take him to a waiting van.

But I digress.

Mayonnaise is really just a fancy way of saying “oil and egg fat.” Here’s the nutritional information, taken from the company’s website:

A one-tablespoon serving contains 90 calories and 90 calories from fat. This is another way of saying that 100% of the calories come from fat. One tablespoon of the stuff has a whopping 10 grams of fat, which is as much fat as four chocolate chip cookies (source: Nutrition Lifestyles).

Hellmann’s Real Mayonnaise also contains delicious EDTA. According to Wikipedia:

(EDTA) has been found to be both cytotoxic (emphasis mine) and weakly genotoxic in laboratory animals. Oral exposures have been noted to cause reproductive and developmental effects.

Cytotoxic means “toxic to cells.” Genotoxic is a little more complicated. According to Wikipedia:

Genotoxicity describes a deleterious action on a cell’s genetic material affecting its integrity. Genotoxic substances are known to be potentially mutagenic or carcinogenic, specifically those capable of causing genetic mutation and of contributing to the development of tumors.

In other words, EDTA is a potential cancer-causing agent in laboratory animals.

At the bottom of the ad, in tiny print, it says that Helmann’s Real Mayonnaise contains “a small amount of EDTA to protect quality.” Small compared to what?

Is Hellmann’s Real Mayonnaise healthy and good? You decide. Then ask yourself this question:

“If we knew more about our food, would we eat better?”

By Marc Librescu

Better Marriage Blanket Filters a Mighty Wind

This is a TV commercial for something called The Better Marriage Blanket. It has a layer of activated charcoal that is supposed to filter out your “flatulence molecules.”

My favorite part of this commercial is where they say: “It makes a great wedding gift or anniversary gift!” I imagine if you gave this as a wedding gift, the bride and groom would cut you out of their lives. If you gave it as an anniversary gift, you’d probably be on the way to divorce court.

By Marc Librescu

The Hamilton Collection Redefines Art

The Hamilton Collection

This might be the worst ad ever for the worst product ever.

According to this ad for The Hamilton Collection, today’s hottest new artist is someone named Margaret Le Van. That sound you hear is the sound of thousands of dead artists rolling over in their graves. Rembrandt, Picasso, Michelangelo, Monet, Manet and Cezanne are all spinning so fast that scientists fear the force it’s creating may change the orbit of the Earth and send it on a death spiral into the sun.

In the copy, we find this line: bolded, italicized and underlined to emphasize its importance:

Plus, she features lifelike eyelashes, a trademark of Ms. Le Can’s art!

If only Picasso had thought to include “lifelike eyelashes” in his paintings — he might have become a real artist!

There’s also a line saying this monstrosity is offered “in a hand-numbered limited edition of 95 casting days.” However, it neglects to say how many pieces were created in a casting day. Maybe some factory in China cranked out 11,000 of these babies a day and there are over a million of these eyesores littering the planet. Who knows?

The ad shows a pink ribbon and states that a portion of the proceeds will be donated to help find a cure for breast cancer but it doesn’t specify what portion. It could be 50 percent. It could be .001 percent. We don’t know.

If you’d like to help find a cure for breast cancer, you can make a donation directly to the Susan G. Komen Foundation. You’ll know how much is going to charity and you won’t have to demonstrate your bad taste in art to your friends.

By Marc Librescu

Soyjoy Does a 180

SoyJoy

When I first wrote about a Soyjoy ad back in 2008, the ad was so bad it made me want to cry and scream and throw things around the room. The second time I posted about the company’s ad, I thought it looked great but was too generic (and I went off on my high-horse about possible problems from eating soy).

This ad nails it. The image merges blueberry, soy and the yin-yang symbol. The headline, along with the image, tells the story:

Whole Soy. Real Blueberries. In Perfect Balance.

There isn’t a load of unnecessary copy for the reader to wade through. It just works.

By Marc Librescu