Clorox Cleans Billy Socks’ Socks

Here’s the headline for this ad for Clorox Bleach that ran on the back cover of the National Enquirer (that’s right, I read the National Enquirer so you don’t have to):

BILLY SOCKS
HE HAS SHOES. HE JUST CAN’T
REMEMBER WHERE HE PUT THEM

Let’s ignore for a moment that this kid has the improbable name of Billy Socks. No, you’re right—it’s too stupid to ignore. Maybe the kid’s in the mob and that’s his nickname.

“Yo, I hear that Billy Socks runs the numbers rackets in Brooklyn.”

The problem with this ad is that they show a before photo and there’s no after photo. The implication is that Clorox is going to get that mud right out of Billy Sock’s socks.

Great. Show it.

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2 responses to “Clorox Cleans Billy Socks’ Socks

  1. Billy Socks is not a name, it is a description of the socks, showing the personality of the owner. Everyone knows a kid like this, I like this ad and I understood the implication without the “after” shot.

  2. Sorry, but your explanation just doesn’t make any sense. If “Billy Socks” is a “description of the socks,” then the word used to describe “socks” would have to be “Billy” which is a proper noun and not an adjective. If someone asked you “What kind of socks are those?” and you replied: “Billy,” the person asking the question would quickly assume you were a loony and walk the other way.

    If you read the ad’s headline, it clearly says: “Billy Socks. He has shoes.” “He” is a personal pronoun that stands for a male person (or animal). “He” can never stand for socks. If someone said, “Those are nice socks you have there,” you couldn’t reply: “He has a hole in it.”