Bridgestone Run-Flat Tires

AdMonkey reviews today's ads. www.admonkey.org

This ad for Bridgestone Run-Flat tires ran in Wired magazine across two pages. Let’s take a look at what this product actually is. On page two, the copy reads:

Bridgestone Run-Flat tires let you drive up to 50 miles at 50 mph after a flat so you can avoid the potential danger of changing tires along a busy highway.

This sounds like a great product. Who wouldn’t want tires that let you keep driving after you get a flat? If the tires work as advertised, every car owner should want to buy them.

Instead of running one ad across two pages, Bridgestone decided to run a separate ad on each page. Because the two ads are united by the same logo, it looks like one two-page ad. But the images on each page run together in a way that’s really confusing. The tire on the left side looks like it’s part of the car on the right.

The headline on the left ad reads:
RUN-FLAT TIRES
KEEP DRIVERS IN CONTROL
.

This doesn’t tell me much about Run-Flat tires. How do they keep drivers in control? In control of what?

To answer this question, I’m supposed to read the copy on the page, which I’m not going to do, because:

  1. I’m busy.
  2. The ad isn’t compelling.
  3. I’m not all that interested in tires.

Bridgestone thinks that I have nothing better to do than to read through all the features of their new tires. They’re wrong. If I don’t read the copy, I won’t find out what Run-Flat tires are.

In the scan, I can read the subhead that says:
BRIDGESTONE’S
SELF SUPPORTING
RUN FLAT TIRES
(RTFs)

But In the actual ad, the line is all but illegible because of the blue against the gray background. It hardly matters because all the subhead tells me is that the tires are “self supporting.” What does this mean? Do the tires get a job and turn the paycheck over to me until they’ve paid for themselves?

The ad on the right has a good headline:
He’s about to get a flat tire.
He’s not about to stop.

That’s great. It makes me ask: Why?

And I have my answer in the copy below:

Bridgestone Run-Flat tires let you drive up to 50 miles at 50 mph after a flat so you can avoid the potential danger of changing tires along a busy highway.

But that’s all that’s good. The design of this ad is awful. It looks like something horrible has happened and the top of the car was sliced off. The driver hasn’t yet realized that his torso and legs are still in the car, and that his upper half is flying through the air.

It doesn’t really matter. The reader has probably already turned the page. The expensive two-age ad misses its target.

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One response to “Bridgestone Run-Flat Tires

  1. Pingback: Bridgestone Ad for Run-Flats « News from Notch Consulting Group